“When things come at you very fast, naturally you lose touch with yourself.” ~ Marshall McLuhan

Turn On, Tune In, Drop Out (Original Movie Sou...

Turn On, Tune In, Drop Out (Original Movie Soundtrack) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Remember “Turn on, tune in, drop out”? Timothy Leary may have been talking about LSD, but part of his message is still relevant, perhaps even moreso today. We spend so much time turning on our devices that many of us have no idea as to how to go about dropping out. This conundrum is something I’ve been mulling over more and more, and in that vein, I thought I’d share part of an article from December 2011. It’s relevance is perhaps more pressing today than when it was penned.

Excerpt from “The Joy of Quiet” by Pico Iyer (NYTimes.com)

Has it really come to this?

In barely one generation we’ve moved from exulting in the time-saving devices that have so expanded our lives to trying to get away from them — often in order to make more time. The more ways we have to connect, the more many of us seem desperate to unplug. Like teenagers, we appear to have gone from knowing nothing about the world to knowing too much all but overnight.

Internet rescue camps in South Korea and China try to save kids addicted to the screen.

Writer friends of mine pay good money to get the Freedom software that enables them to disable (for up to eight hours) the very Internet connections that seemed so emancipating not long ago. Even Intel (of all companies) experimented in 2007 with conferring four uninterrupted hours of quiet time every Tuesday morning on 300 engineers and managers. (The average office worker today, researchers have found, enjoys no more than three minutes at a time at his or her desk without interruption.) During this period the workers were not allowed to use the phone or send e-mail, but simply had the chance to clear their heads and to hear themselves think. A majority of Intel’s trial group recommended that the policy be extended to others.

THE average American spends at least eight and a half hours a day in front of a screen, Nicholas Carr notes in his eye-opening book “The Shallows,” in part because the number of hours American adults spent online doubled between 2005 and 2009 (and the number of hours spent in front of a TV screen, often simultaneously, is also steadily increasing).

The average American teenager sends or receives 75 text messages a day, though one girl in Sacramento managed to handle an average of 10,000 every 24 hours for a month. Since luxury, as any economist will tell you, is a function of scarcity, the children of tomorrow, I heard myself tell the marketers in Singapore, will crave nothing more than freedom, if only for a short while, from all the blinking machines, streaming videos and scrolling headlines that leave them feeling empty and too full all at once.

Blaise Pascal first explained his wager in Pen...

Blaise Pascal

The urgency of slowing down — to find the time and space to think — is nothing new, of course, and wiser souls have always reminded us that the more attention we pay to the moment, the less time and energy we have to place it in some larger context. “Distraction is the only thing that consoles us for our miseries,” the French philosopher Blaise Pascal wrote in the 17th century, “and yet it is itself the greatest of our miseries.” He also famously remarked that all of man’s problems come from his inability to sit quietly in a room alone . . . .

We have more and more ways to communicate, as Thoreau noted, but less and less to say. Partly because we’re so busy communicating. And — as he might also have said — we’re rushing to meet so many deadlines that we hardly register that what we need most are lifelines.

So what to do? The central paradox of the machines that have made our lives so much brighter, quicker, longer and healthier is that they cannot teach us how to make the best use of them; the information revolution came without an instruction manual. All the data in the world cannot teach us how to sift through data; images don’t show us how to process images. The only way to do justice to our onscreen lives is by summoning exactly the emotional and moral clarity that can’t be found on any screen.

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2 thoughts on ““When things come at you very fast, naturally you lose touch with yourself.” ~ Marshall McLuhan

  1. You make some very good points. The Internet seems to absorb time… I try to make sure I read (an actual book), and walk outside, and spend plenty of time away from all the interesting things calling my name when I sign on.

    I think you could write a whole book about this subject…

    Speaking of books, I finished Middlemarch and I’m glad I took the time to read it. Have you ever seen a “fake wall”? There is a cute one called “The Secret Lives of Middlemarch” here.

    http://thewallmachine.com/2eixQF.html

    Hope you are enjoying the roller coaster of weather we’ve been having….

    • I forgot to respond to your comment. The fake wall thing is hilarious. Those show up once in a while on tumblr. People who love what they read can be so witty. That’s the kind of facebook wall I could get into.

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