“You are desperate to communicate, to edify, to entertain, to preserve moments of grace or joy or transcendence, to make real or imagined events come alive.” ~ Anne Lamott, from Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life

sand-castle-201207 creative commons

Sand Castles (creative commons)

                   

“You are lucky to be one of those people who wishes to build sand castles with words, who is willing to create a place where your imagination can wander . . . This is what separates artists from ordinary people: the belief, deep in our hearts, that if we build our castles well enough, somehow the ocean won’t wash them away. I think this is a wonderful kind of person to be.” ~ Anne Lamott, from Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life

Selected sections from Bird by Bird

On Short Assignments (pages 16-17)

. . . But this [trying to write] is like trying to scale a glacier. It’s hard to get your footing, and your fingertips get all red and frozen and torn up. Then your mental illnesses arrive at the desk like your sickest, most secretive relatives. And they pull up chairs in a semicircle around the computer, and they try to be quiet but you know they are there with their weird coppery breath, leering at you behind your back.

What I do at this point, as the panic mounts and the jungle drums begin beating and I realize that the well has run dry and that my future is behind me and I’m going to have to get a job only I’m completely unemployable, is to stop. First I try to breathe, because because I’m either sitting there panting like a lapdog or I’m unintentionally making slow asthmatic death rattles. So I just there for a minute, breathing slowly, quietly. I let my mind wander. After a moment I may notice that I’m trying to decide whether or not I am too old for orthodontia and whether right now would be a good time to make a few calls, and then I start to think about learning to use makeup and how maybe I could find some boyfriend who is not a total and complete fixer-upper and then my life would be totally great and I’d be happy all the time and then I think about all the people I should have called back before I sat down to work, and how I should probably at least check in with my agent and tell him this great idea I have and see if he thinks it’s a good idea, and see if he thinks I need orthodontia—if that is what he is actually thinking whenever we have lunch together. Then I think about someone I’m really annoyed with, or some financial problem that is driving me crazy, and decide that I must resolve this before I get down to today’s work. So I become a dog with a chew toy, worrying it for a while, wrestling it to the ground, flinging it over my shoulder, chasing it, licking it, chewing it, flinging it back over my shoulder. I stop just short of actually barking. But all of this only takes somewhere between one and two minutes, so I haven’t actually wasted that much time. Still, it leaves me winded. I go back to trying to breathe, slowly and calmly, and I finally notice the one-inch picture frame that I put on my desk to remind me of short assignments.

On Perfectionism (page 31)

. . . In any case, the bottom line is that if you want to write, you get to, but you probably won’t be able to get very far if you don’t start trying to get over your perfectionism. You set out to tell a story of some sort, to tell the truth as you feel it, because something is calling you to do so. It calls you like the beckoning finger of smoke in cartoons that rises off the pie cooling on the windowsill, slides under doors and into mouse holes or into the nostrils of the sleeping man or woman in the easy chair. Then the aromatic smoke crooks its finger, and the mouse or the man or woman rises and follows, nose in the air. But some days the smoke is faint and you just have to follow it as best you can, sniffing away. Still, even on those days, you might notice how great perseverance feels. And the next day the scent may seem stronger—or it may just be that you r are developing a quiet doggedness. This is priceless. Perfectionism, on the other hand, will only drive you mad.

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4 thoughts on ““You are desperate to communicate, to edify, to entertain, to preserve moments of grace or joy or transcendence, to make real or imagined events come alive.” ~ Anne Lamott, from Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life

  1. Interesting quotes. I have the book somewhere…

    Funny about the mental illnesses gathering around you as you type… All these things she describes, I can vividly see…

    • I loved that part! Like relatives hovering around you. So true.

      I don’t have the book, but I found a section of it on Google. Now I need to buy it, of course.

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