“If there is one thing I’d learned about hospitals, it’s that they aren’t interested in healing you. They are interested in stabilizing you, and then everyone is supposed to move on. They go to stabilize some more people, and you go off to do whatever you do. Healing, if it happens at all, is done on your own, long after the hospital has submitted your final insurance paperwork.” ~ Eric Nuzum, from Giving Up the Ghost

 

Original cast of the show (1994–1995)

The ER was nothing like this . . .

Update:

Mom was discharged from the hospital this evening. I’m glad she’s out because an extended hospital stay isn’t good for anyone. The doctors who were treating her couldn’t find anything wrong after blood work, CT scans, and x-rays, which is not to say that nothing is wrong, only that they couldn’t find it. She, of course, is in denial. I called her PCP’s office to make sure they follow up with her because the ER doctor wanted her to go on a monitor for two weeks, and mom is already saying that it’s not necessary . . .

I hope that this is a case of no news is good news, but I have a really bad feeling in the pit of my stomach, to wit, my mother says that she’s fine. On the other hand, I am completely exhausted.

 

 

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2 thoughts on ““If there is one thing I’d learned about hospitals, it’s that they aren’t interested in healing you. They are interested in stabilizing you, and then everyone is supposed to move on. They go to stabilize some more people, and you go off to do whatever you do. Healing, if it happens at all, is done on your own, long after the hospital has submitted your final insurance paperwork.” ~ Eric Nuzum, from Giving Up the Ghost

  1. There’s always the thought lurking that something is wrong but they aren’t going to find it because they are doing some kind of 12 point check that doesn’t involve anything unless it follows their schematic. Deep down in the pit of your stomach you’re afraid that when they do look beyond that schematic, it will be stage 4 and inoperable.

    Of course, on the other hand, I consider it a major victory if I get out of the office without being given any kind of prescription. Because, inevitably, you go home and see five or six TV advertisements advising you that if you’ve been taking *bleep* and have bladder cancer, you should call them and join the class action suit. OR, it’s just a drug commercial that lists side effects, which include death.

    Doing the doctor thing with parents is always fun, isn’t it?

    I hope both of you can get some relaxation at home, now, and that things will turn out alright.

    • I’m a worrier, obviously. But I completely agree with your 12-point schematic. It’s a rare doctor who is willing to look beyond that, whether it’s because of time restraints imposed by the parent company or because of apathy brought on by exhaustion.

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