Sunday afternoon . . .

William-Adolphe Bouguereau Petite fille au bouquet 1896 oil on canvas

Petite fille au bouquet (1896, oil on canvas)
by William-Adolphe Bouguereau

Animated version of above


 “At the heart of all great art is an essential melancholy.” ~ Federico García Lorca

Sunday afternoon. Partly cloudy, warmer and humid, 79 degrees.

Woke up with the same headache and a buzzing sound in the back of my head only to realize that Mike was out back with the chainsaw working on the tree that fell on the fence. Corey is paying him to do the work while he’s gone, and man, is it a job and a half. I don’t think that Corey realized just how much stuff was overgrown back there; I know I didn’t.

Anyway, it’s another necessary part of getting things done around here, so that’s a half check on the list (project isn’t completed). Moving right along . . .

The following series of images appeal to the part of me who wishes she had been an art history major. More and more, I wish that I had gotten one of my degrees in art history, as I find that my love of art is almost as intense as my love of words. I only wish that I had been exposed to the art that I see and share on a daily basis back when I was working for the art museum. I think, no, I know that I could have gotten even more out of the experience.

I spent more than one lazy hour wandering the galleries when I found myself overwrought and overstressed. It never failed to calm me.

Anyway, I’m pretty sure that I’ve shared the video by Italian animator Rino Stefano Tagliafierro before, but I don’t think that I’ve posted the images individually. I find these animations of Renaissance paintings so compelling, and admittedly, some more than a bit creepy. Tagliafierro took around 100 images and brought them to life using the 2.5D effect. I’m reposting his short video “Beauty” below.

The aspect of this that truly amazes me is how, because of the rich details and layers of light, these paintings lent themselves so well to being animated, not that I’m implying that what Taliafierro did was in any way easy. Do I dare to think that many of these old masters would appreciate the repurposing of their original works? I do, and I think that they would. But that’s just me.

Enjoy.


Music by Joshua Radin, “Someone Else’s Life”

                     

Musée Des Beaux Arts

About suffering they were never wrong,
The Old Masters: how well they understood
Its human position; how it takes place
While someone else is eating or opening a window or just
walking dully along;
How, when the aged are reverently, passionately waiting
For the miraculous birth, there always must be
Children who did not specially want it to happen, skating
On a pond at the edge of the wood:
They never forgot
That even the dreadful martyrdom must run its course
Anyhow in a corner, some untidy spot
Where the dogs go on with their doggy life and the torturer’s
horse
Scratches its innocent behind on a tree.

In Brueghel’s Icarus, for instance: how everything turns away
Quite leisurely from the disaster; the ploughman may
Have heard the splash, the forsaken cry,
But for him it was not an important failure; the sun shone
As it had to on the white legs disappearing into the green
Water: and the expensive delicate ship that must have seen
Something amazing, a boy falling out of the sky,
Had somewhere to get to and sailed calmly on.

~ W. H. Auden

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