If it’s Friday, it must mean leftovers . . .

forgot to hit publish . . .


Friday afternoon, stormy and muggy, 84 degrees.

Something that I did not know (or did not remember that I knew at one time) that I really should have known because it’s so blatantly obvious: The red markings on a metal measuring tape every 16 inches indicate the traditional placement of wall studs, so if you don’t have a stud finder, you’re still good to go . . .

I know. It’s the small things . . .


The Des Moines Register, Iowa, July 16, 1939

Intelligencer Journal, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, August 25, 1913

True story: When I first started working at Dillard’s a lifetime ago, I came off a double shift, and my feet were aching. The next day before work, I used some pain cream that my mom had given me, having no idea that it contained capsaicin. I was only at work about an hour before the pain in my feet became so extreme that I had to sit down in the floor. By the time that I made it home my feet were bright red and blistered.

Moral of the story: Never use anything containing capsaicin on your body unless you want more pain than the pain you’re trying to alleve.

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If it’s Friday it must mean leftovers . . .

The Brooklyn Citizen, New York, September 24, 1899

“as if reality had become naked and nothing remained except the silent
spinning of atoms and molecules
it was a flapping of wings over blue and white waves, a sparkle of
sun on the rocks” ~ Octavio Paz, from “Kostas Papaioannou”

Friday afternoon, sunny and hot, 87 degrees.

Not the best day. It’s stuffy in the house, and we still have no AC.

Corey has gone to a health fair offering free dental, vision, and medical care. His tooth problem has gotten really bad, and it needs to be pulled. He got up before 5 a.m. to be there at 6 for the tickets, only to be told that today’s slots were all filled. He was told to come back at 2 to get a slot for tomorrow when there will be more providers. It’s an hour each way. He said that there were tons of people there.

Tell again there’s nothing wrong with healthcare in this country . . .

Bailey and Tillie got in another fight as soon as Corey left the house . . .

There will be no funeral or service for Dallas, and the lawyer has advised us not to get involved in the whole situation involving his ashes because we had offered to take care of them. This whole situation really, really sucks . . .

Not much of a collection for today, but a good segment from Colbert. Just not into it, plus computer woes continue . . .


Needs no explanation:

Too true, that . . .

How is it that this kid has a better plan at her age than I’ve ever had at any age?

At last, scientific proof of the concept that has plagued me forever; the peer reviewer’s comments are pure gold:

My kind of grandma . . .

The Decatur Herald, Illinois, August 23, 1935

For those who didn’t watch the entire second night of the Democratic debates, here’s a good snapshot:

“Miraculously God has already done it. Don’t tell them She put it on Amazon instead.” ~ Cheryl Morgan*

El Paso Times, Texas, January 15, 1938

If it’s Friday, it must mean leftovers . . .

Friday afternoon, sunny (finally) and cooler, 69 degrees.

We’re trying to wean Roland from the bottle as he’ll be two months old tomorrow, but it’s hard as anytime he sees Zeke getting a bottle, he wants one. I just called Roland to try to get him away from Corey, who was feeding Zeke (a lot of names here, huh?), and Roland actually slid across the coffee table to get to me. I think that one of these goats is getting too big for the house . . .

Today’s collection is brought to you by Benadryl, what I’ve been slathering on my body for weeks now to try to calm the itch. Benadryl. It’s good for what ails you.

Seriously though, I may never venture outside again. Anyway, enjoy.


File under: Amazing but True—People have always been this way . . .

Pittsburgh Daily Post, Pennsylvania, April 5, 1850

I like to think that this was written just for me:

Celebrating the summer solstice:

I never knew this:

Didn’t know this either:

Cant tell if I’m more bothered by the pigeons or more in tune with the captions:

We take the freshness of our biscuits very seriously, indeed:

The Victoria Daily Times, British Columbia, February 21, 1931

My immediate first thought was how can he possibly afford this:

This is kind of arrogant. I mean, what if Mars already has a calendar system?

And finally . . . I shouldn’t be surprised by anything, any more:

The Miami News, Florida, March 8, 1938

*From an article in the Guardian about a Christian group petitioning the wrong company to cancel Good Omens . . .

“Always lists to be made, as if writing items in neat vertical rows might stave off randomness and chaos.” ~ Dani Shapiro, from Inheritance: A Memoir of Genealogy, Paternity, and Love

The News, Paterson, New Jersey, May 13, 1944

If it’s Friday, it must mean leftovers . . .

Friday afternoon, clouds and rains, 69 degrees.

A pretty good collection today. All sourced from tumblr. Enjoy.


Mind-reading duck? Really? Hmm . . .

Great Falls Tribune, Montana, December 12, 1916

Yep.

This was my favorite book to read Alexis when she was little:

This is so spot on. I never realized other people felt this way:

Well this might explain it:

I used to love the old “Tom and Jerry” cartoons . . .

Kind of like buying stock in Google or Amazon when they first started, neither of which I own:

Want one of these. They’re supposed to be good protection for other animals:

And finally, in honor of the D-Day 75th Anniversary:

British paratrooper veterans sitting across from their own younger selves in the same plane which dropped them over Normandy. 6 June 2018.

“Resolution #4: I must encourage greedy people to use the term, ‘Low-hanging fruit,’ because that’s just like old times.” (Crowley) ~ Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, Crowley & Aziraphale’s New Year’s Wishes


If it’s Friday, it must mean leftovers . . .

Friday afternoon, mostly sunny and lovely, 76 degrees.

Cannot wait to watch the  Good Omens adaptation with David Tennant and Michael Sheen, except that means we need to hook up the Blu-Ray to get access to Amazon Prime, which means . . . probably not going to watch it anytime soon . . .

A bit of a hodgepodge collection. Enjoy.


The miracle of tea:

Rules to live by:

Totally relatable:

Goats? Yep.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Missouri, July 21, 1908

Hmm . . .

Not I can’t stop thinking about a spider wearing flip flops. . .

Good for him:

Good boy:

And finally, coffee. Yes.:

The Topeka Daily Capital, Kansas, January 14, 1904

If it’s Friday, it must mean leftovers . . .

“It is the finest spring ever known—soft, hot, blue, misty.” ~ Virginia Woolf, from a diary entry written c. March 1928

Friday afternoon, sunny and beautiful, 85 degrees.

First word that comes to mind (I enjoyed doing this, so it may appear here more often): scumbling (art term). Don’t know where in the recesses that was hidden.

I keep having dreams about an old friend from junior and high school: A. Steindler. I wonder why she’s visiting my dreams?

I had this sudden flash of memory whilst meandering through tumblr today: My mother used to go to a bakery inside of the old Montgomery Ward to buy Napoleon pastries for the two of us. Isn’t that odd: a bakery inside a Montgomery Ward? They were exquisitely delicious. I’m certain that my love of desserts comes from my mother raising me on all different kinds.

Today’s collection is a bit different. I found a comic by Grant Snider, who I’ve posted before, and I came across a wild story about a woman’s date with a very different kind of guy.

Enjoy.

More later Peace.


From Incidental Comics:

Wanted to share this story from the tumblr No Bad Dates, Just Good Stories. After this post, the writer was contacted by other women who had similar stories (click the link for more). Can I say once again how very,  very glad I am that I’m not part of the dating scene. Its a weird, dangerous world out there . . .

imageimageimageimage

P.S. This woman was much nicer than I would have been.

Serendipitous: As I was walking the other day, I realized that I haven’t seen many dandelions around here:

And then there’s this:

 

If it’s Friday, it must mean leftovers . . .

The San Francisco Examiner, California, February 25, 1935
“More and more, it feels like I’m doing a really bad impersonation of myself.” ~ Chuck Palahniuk, from Choke

Friday afternoon, partly cloudy, warmer, 73 degrees.

I thought that I’d add something a little different to today’s leftovers post. I was trying to fall asleep when I thought of this list of firsts:

First:

  • word that pops into your head: palimpsest
  • song that pops into your head: “House of the Rising Sun”
  • TV theme show you think of: “Gilligan’s Island”
  • smell that reaches your nose: freshly mown grass
  • sound you hear: a rooster crowing
  • name of first person you think of (not a relative): Sarah
  • name of first person you think of (relative): Alexis
  • artist you think of: Van Gogh
  • classical composer that comes to mind: Chopin
  • author you think of: Tolkien
  • poet you think of: Anne Sexton
  • kind of food that comes to mind: peanut butter cup
  • drink that pops into your head: chocolate milkshake
  • movie title you think of: Legends of the Fall
  • fictional character that comes to mind: Sherlock Holmes

Vintage newspaper articles:

The Herald-Press, Saint Joseph, Michigan, August 5, 1938

Anxiety problem:

From ultrafacts.tumblr.com:

Lone females retreated to isolated nesting boxes on penthouse levels. Other males, a group Calhoun termed “the beautiful ones,” never sought sex and never fought—they just ate, slept, and groomed, wrapped in narcissistic introspection. Elsewhere, cannibalism, and violence became endemic. Mouse society had collapsed.

Beneath the surface of Japan’s Tateyama Bay stands a shrine called a torii, sacred to the Shinto religion. But more than being a place of spiritual importance, the underwater site is host to something else that’s remarkable — a unique friendship between a man and a fish.

For more than two decades, a local diver named Hiroyuki Arakawa has been entrusted with overseeing the shrine and being a guide to others who wish to visit it. In that time, he’s become well-acquainted with the local marine animals who live in the area — including one friendly Asian sheepshead wrasse named Yoriko.

Over the course of 25 years, the pair have forged an incredible bond based on trust and respect.

Perhaps the sweetest testament to their friendship can be seen in Arakawa’s custom of greeting Yoriko with a kiss.

I used to have a beautiful Samoyed named Sasha. I’d love to have another one:

And finally: