Reblogged from Curious History:

The Amazing Fly Geyser

Fly Geyser is not a very well known tourist attraction, even to Nevada residents. There is a reason for this: the geyser is on privately owned land and it is not open to the public. Another little known fact about Fly Geyser is that it began as a well. The original well was drilled in 1916 and functioned normally for almost fifty years until nature decided to take over.

In the 1960s, geothermally-heated water found a weak spot in the well’s wall and began escaping to the surface. Dissolved minerals in the water started to accumulate resulting in this incredible natural phenomena seen today. Although Fly Geyer, including its base, is only 12 feet (3.7 m) high, it will continue to grow as long as it continues to spout water.

The beautifully colored geyser, surrounded by small pools and other stunning geological formations is only open to scientists by appointment. We might think the land owner is behaving rather stingy by not sharing this amazing creation of the planet with others. However, there are those who feel that if they owned an actual geologic phenomena, they might keep it to themselves as well.  At least he’s not exploiting the situation by charging people to view it. Now that would be shameful.

(Source: iliketowastemytime.com)

 

Since my Hogwarts letter still hasn’t arrived . . .

Reblogged from Curious History:

Abandoned Cottages in the Woods Overtaken by Animals

In a series titled Once Upon a Home, photographer Kai Fagerström captured the new residents of abandoned cottages in the woods. After residents had passed away or relocated, a group of feral animals took over the spaces. In a story published for National Geographic, Fagerström captured the “wild squatters” in a handful of derelict dwellings near his family’s summer home in rural Suomusjärvi, Finland.

sources 1, 2

Oh, to live in one of these lovely homes . . .

Reblogged from Curious History:

(Showing 7; click link to see all)

Ten of the Best Storybook Cottage Homes Around the World

These 10 fairy tale inspired cottages with their hand-made details call to mind the tales of the Brothers Grimm and other fantasy stories. All of these cottages are real-life homes from around the world. From stunning cottage houses to mystical stone dwellings, these 10 storybook cottage homes provide inspiration and inspire the imagination.

  1. Hobbit House – Rotorua, New Zealand
  2. Winckler Cottage – Vancouver Island, Canada
  3. Akebono kodomo-no-mori Park, Japan
  4. Wooden Cottage – Białka Tatrzańska, Tatra Mountains, Poland
  5. Blaise Hamlet – Bristol, England
  6. Willa Kominiarski Wierch – Zakopane, Poland
  7. Forest House – Efteling, The Netherlands
  8. Cottage in the Hamlet of Marie Antoinette – Versailles, France
  9. Cob House – Somerset, United Kingdom
  10. The Spadena House – Beverly Hills, California, United States

“We build too many walls and not enough bridges.” ~ Sir Isaac Newton

“We cross our bridges when we come to them and burn them behind us, with nothing to show for our progress except a memory of the smell of smoke, and a presumption that once our eyes watered.” ~ Tom Stoppard

I wish I were here instead of in the middle of a major bathroom renovation . . . Oh well . . .

Reblogged from Curious History:

The Gothic Denham Bridge

This is an old pack horse Bridge across the River Tavy. Although only a minor road, Denham Bridge Lane is the main highway not far from Buckland Monachorum, a beautiful small village on Dartmoor in South Denham, England.

source 1, 2, 3

Simon & Garfunkel, “Bridge Over Troubled Water” (from Central Park Concert)

                   

Rialto

When my mother said Let’s go down to the Rialto
it never occurred to me that the name Rialto

was odd or from anywhere else or meant anything
other than Rialto the theatre in my hometown

like the Orpheum, whose name was only a phoneme
with no trace of the god of Poetry, though

later I would learn about him and about the bridge
and realize that gods and bridges can fly invisibly

across the ocean and change their shapes and land
in one’s hometown and go on living there

until it’s time to fly again and start all over
as a perfectly clean phoneme in the heads

of the innocent and the open
on their way to the Ritz.

~ Ron Padgett

“Controlled hysteria is what’s required. To exist constantly in a state of controlled hysteria. It’s agony. But everyone has agony. The difference is that I try to take my agony home and teach it to sing.” ~ Arthur Miller

https://i1.wp.com/i.imgur.com/Gv3xD5u.jpg

                   

We began the bathroom renovation today . . . Gutting, finding lots of problems beneath, water damage, mold. This is going to be long, slow, and very, very painful. There isn’t enough chocolate in the world to make this better.

Oh, on one positive note—my migraine left for about 12 hours, but gone completely? Heavens, that would be miraculous . . .

Thought I’d post these images of abandoned North Brother Island as this is kind of what our bathroom looks like at the moment.

Copy reblogged from Curious History:

Abandoned North Brother Island, New York

North Brother Island, located in between Queens and the Bronx in New York, has a long and fascinating history. The entire island has now been abandoned for nearly 50 years.

In the 1880s, the island was used to build a hospital complex to quarantine and treat people suffering from smallpox and typhoid fever. This hospital was home to the infamous “Typhoid Mary.” She was forcibly isolated twice by public health authorities after infecting 51 people with typhoid, three of whom died, over the course of her career as a cook. She spent nearly three decades in isolation on North Brother Island until her own death.

The hospital was later turned into housing for World War II veterans attending school on the GI Bill. In the 1950s, the island was home to one of the first juvenile drug rehabilitation centers in history. It remained in operation until the island was abandoned in 1963.

They tried to sell the island to private investors in the 1970s but the cost of construction, transportation to the island, and the noise from Laguardia airport discouraged anyone from buying it.

In June, 2013, it was announced that two architecture students are planning to construct a learning school for autistic children on the 20-acre island. It is currently unknown if and when this project will come to fruition.

“And the needles of the pine trees, freshly washed to a deep, rich green, shimmered with droplets that blinked like clear crystals.” ~ Billie Letts, from Shoot the Moon

If it’s Friday, it must mean leftovers . . .

Reblogged from Curious History

 

Devil’s Bridge

Kromlauer Park is a gothic style, 200-acre country park in the municipality of Kromlau in the Görlitz Gablenzgasse district in Germany. An incredible attraction of the park is the Rakotzbrücke, more popularly known as Devil’s Bridge.

The impressive arch bridge was built around 1860. During its construction, other peculiar rock formations were built on the lake and in the park. Devil’s Bridge is no longer open to the public to ensure its preservation. A unique feature of the bridge is that its reflection on the water’s surface creates a flawless circle, regardless of which side is being viewed.

(Source: akvision.de)

                   

Music by Mad Season, “All Alone”