“There is no exquisite beauty… without some strangeness in the proportion.” ~ Edgar Allan Poe

Never managed to get together a Two for Tuesday post, but here, have some awesome E. A. Poe:

Reblogged from My Modern Met

Ghostly Edgar Allan Poe Statue is Coming to Boston


Boston, come this fall, you’re going to get one awesome statue. Professional sculptor Stefanie Rocknak beat out 265 other artists from 42 states and 13 countries to create a sculpture honoring author and poet Edgar Allan Poe. A five-member artist selection committee decided on Rocknak’s stunning work that shows Poe with a suitcase in hand and a raven in front of him. Boston is the place of Poe’s birth.

“I propose to cast a life-size figure of Poe in bronze. Just off the train, the figure would be walking south towards his place of birth, where his mother and father once lived. Poe, with a trunk full of ideas—and worldwide success—is finally coming home,” said Rocknak of the design she calls Poe Returning to Boston. “His expression is complex. He is determined and his stride is decisive. His face reflects a mixture of pain, anger and sadness, and from some angles, a subtle sense of hope. As he walks towards Carver Street, he openly dismisses what is behind him with his left hand; the Frogpondians to the north. Boston is not claiming Poe, Poe is claiming Boston. To punctuate this, he leaves a literal paper trail behind him. He has not only left his mark on the world, he has left it on the city of his birth. His ideas are jumping off the page and cascading out of his trunk; a heart lies just behind him, and an oversized Raven explodes to the south. The Raven, which has become symbolic of Poe’s brooding creative spirit, visually reflects Poe; his coat mimics the raven’s wing, and, like a bird, Poe is slightly pigeon-toed. They are one, heading up-wind towards their final resting place.”

“The sense of Poe returning triumphant with creative ideas bursting forth from his suitcase is very appealing,” according to project manager Jean Mineo. “The review committee, and public input, conveyed great excitement with the dynamic sense of movement, accessible style, and Poe’s creative energy expressed in the proposal. There is also strong support for Steff’s approachable, ground level statue that helps humanize Poe and place him in the context of this active neighborhood,” Mineo said.

The eerie, ghost-like statue, which will be life-sized or approximately 5’ 8” tall, is set to be unveiled on October 4, 2014, just three days before the 165th anniversary of the writer’s death. (This is the final design model in clay.) It will live at the corner of Boylston Street and Charles Street South or the place where Mayor Menino dubbed “Edgar Allan Poe Square.” This is just two blocks north of where Poe was born back in 1809.





Edgar Allan Poe Square Public Art Project
via [The Artery]

“I didn’t notice a change in their faces until I put the three together, though, and that was a revelation.” ~ Lalage Snow, Photographer and creator of We Are The Not Dead

I find this utterly heartbreaking. Look at their eyes. My god, their eyes.

                   

Reblogged from My Modern Met


Lance Corporal Sean Tennant, 29

Photographer Lalage Snow, who is currently based in Kabul, Afghanistan, embarked on an 8-month-long project titled We Are The Not Dead featuring portraits of British soldiers before, during, and after their deployment in Afghanistan. Similar to Claire Felicie’s series of monochromatic triptychs, Snow captures the innocent expressions of these men transformed into gaunt, sullen faces in less than a year.

The three-panel juxtaposition allows the viewer to observe the physical changes a stationed soldier in a war zone goes through. Time is sped up for these men under the beating sun, amidst combat. Regardless of age, the boys that went in came back as men with experiences beyond their years. As weathered and worn as their skin or sunken in faces may appear, it’s their dilated eyes that are the most telling.

Additionally, Snow’s series accompanies each triptych with quotes from each of the servicemen that gives a great deal of insight into their mental and emotional state at each given time. Sergeant Alexander McBroom’s first portrait, before deployment, features him bravely saying, “I am not worried about going out – it is my job after all.” Three months later, he is quoted as saying, “It has been an eye opener.” And, finally, another four months after, he says, “It is always that fear, that apprehension, what is going to happen if I get blown up?” Having gone through life-altering trials and warfare, it is no surprise that fear is no longer a foreign feeling to these courageous men.

Snow’s intention with the series is to not only honor their bravery by featuring them, but to also draw attention to every soldiers’ psychological transformation. She says, “It was a very personal project and stemmed from having embedded with the military on and off for 4 years in Iraq and Afghanistan and bearing witness to how many young men return as shadows of their former selves and, in many cases, with deep, psychological scars. As the body count of British servicemen killed or wounded rose and the political ramifications of the British army’s presence in Afghanistan became increasingly convoluted, more and more soldiers felt like they didn’t have a voice, or at least, weren’t being listened to. We Are The Not Dead is an attempt at giving the brave young men and women the chance to explain how it really is.”

Update: See more triptychs and read our exclusive, one-on-one interview with Lalage Snow, here.

“When I dipt into the future far as human eye could see; | Saw the Vision of the world and all the wonder that would be.—” ~ Alfred Lord Tennyson, from “Locksley Hall”

                  

“We have your satellite if you want it back send 20 billion in Martian money. No funny business or you will never see it again.” ~ Seen on a hall wall at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Labs

It took me four tries to type in my password just because I kept tripping over the keys. Today is not the day to sit down for a writing session. Instead, enjoy the beautiful images that follow:

From My Modern Met

Not many people get to travel to outer space, but here, we can at least see what it looks like from amazing aerial perspectives. Landsat 5, a satellite that observed our planet for more than 29 years in space, will soon be ending it’s mission. Originally set to orbit Earth for three years, the satellite lived well beyond its intended means. But, a recently broken gyroscope has declared the end of the machine’s time in space.

It orbited Earth more than 150,000 times, capturing more than 2.5 million images of our world’s terrain. In honor of the mission’s end, here are a collection of Landsat 5’s best images of our planet. Landsat 7, which has been orbiting Earth since 1999, will remain overhead and Landsat 8 will be launched into space in February 2013.

Mergui Archipelago, Myanmar
Mount Elgon, Uganda-Kenya Border
Belcher Islands, Canada
Wabash and Ohio Rivers
Painted Desert, Arizona
Dhofar Region, Oman
Erg Iguidi, Algeria
Rhodes, Greece
New England
Lake Eyre, Australia

Okavango River, Botswana

Landsat website